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MarkWest announces two new infrastructure additions to Ohio’s Utica Shale region

mmohio1-300x171By Bob Downing

A Denver-based company is continuing to expand its processing facilities for natural gas and liquids in Ohio’s Utica Shale region.

MarkWest Energy Partners has announced seven major infrastructure projects, including two new projects in Ohio.

Among the projects is an expansion at the gas-processing plant at Cadiz in Harrison County. Known as Cadiz III, the addition is scheduled to be completed in early 2015 and will increase capacity there to about 525 million cubic feet per day.

Capacity at the Cadiz complex currently tops out at about 125 million cubic feet per day. That will grow to 325 million cubic feet per day in September with the addition of Cadiz II and will grow again with the completion of Cadiz III, says MarkWest Utica EMG, a partnership between MarkWest and the Texas-based Energy and Minerals Group.

The second project will expand the Hopedale fractionation complex in northern Harrison County. The plant is handling 60,000 barrels per day, and with the expansion early next year that will grow to 120,000 barrels per day in separating propane and other natural gas liquids.

Read more:

http://www.ohio.com/news/local/markwest-announces-two-new-infrastructure-additions-to-ohio-s-utica-shale-region-1.512675

 
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NRG to close, convert or retrofit 4 Illinois coal plants

natural-gas-electrical-generation-plant1With NRG’s purchase of Edison Mission Energy in April 2014,  they took ownership of four coal-fired power stations in Illinois. Beyond employing a substantial number of people and contributing to the Illinois economy, these plants provide local reliability to the electric grid. As  witnessed last winter, local generation is vital during periods of peak demand. Until now, the reliability services these four coal plants provide have come at a cost of higher than desired emissions – in short, they have not yet been updated to meet environmental standards. NRG  sees a different future for these facilities – one in which they can preserve reliability AND materially reduce air emissions. NRG has in turn committed to transform these four plants by implementing a combination of advanced emission controls, re-fueling coal units to operate on natural gas and ceasing operations of coal units.

Dive Brief: By Herman K. Trabish

  • NRG Energy Inc.’s $567 million plan to close one coal plant, convert another to natural gas by 2016, and retrofit two others with pollution control technology will provide half the cuts required by the proposed EPA greenhouse gas reduction regulations for Illinois, where the four facilities acquired last year by NRG are located.
  • The moves will reduce the 2013 CO2 emissions in Illinois by 16 million tons by 2020, the equivalent of 4 million cars’ annual CO2 emissions, and they will also reduce Illinois 2013 sulfur dioxide emissions 90%, nitrogen oxide emissions by 65%, particulate matter 70%, and mercury 53%.
  • The cost of the plan will not come from ratepayers or government subsidies but it will cost about 250 of the plants’ 600 jobs, most at the shuttered Romeoville plant and the converted Joliet plant, with fewer at the retrofitted Pekin and Waukegan plants.

Read more: http://www.utilitydive.com/news/nrg-to-close-convert-or-retrofit-4-illinois-coal-plants/295546/

 
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Small gas-to-liquids plant planned for former Houston power plant site

Column tower in petrochemical plant at twilightby Rhiannon Meyers

Biofuels Power Corp. plans to build a small-scale plant to convert natural gas to synthetic crude on a former power plant site south of downtown Houston as it looks to capitalize on abundant supplies of cheap natural gas, the company announced Monday.

The gas-to-liquids plant is a pilot project, the first step in the Humble-based company’s plans to build several small plants at oil fields across the U.S. to capture and convert natural gas now stranded at well sites that don’t have processing or transportation infrastructure to carry the gas to market.

Advances in hydraulic fracturing and horizontal drilling have unlocked vast quantities of natural gas from dense rock formations,  but producers have to burn off stranded gas for lack of a way to transport and sell it.

With its demonstration project, Biofuels Power Corp. hopes to show that small-scale gas-to-liquids plants are commercially viable alternatives for companies curtailing or stopping natural gas production because it’s too expensive to expand and build infrastructure to gather, process and transmit natural gas.

New legislation regulating flaring make such projects even more attractive, Biofuels Power Corp. said.

“With an abundant natural gas resource base, future gas-to-liquids developments like this could fill a need in the energy industry for decades to come,” Eric Gadd, chief commercial officer, said in a statement.

Read more:

http://fuelfix.com/blog/2014/08/04/small-gas-to-liquids-plant-planned-for-former-houston-power-plant-site/

 
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EIA: Bakken fuels North Dakota’s oil production growth

silhouette oil pumps

North Dakota crude oil production surpassed 1.0 million barrels per day (bbl/d) in April and May (the latest data available). This record is the result of increasing crude oil production from the Williston Basin’s Bakken and Three Forks formations in North Dakota and eastern Montana.

Although Bakken oil production initially began in the 1950s at Antelope Field in North Dakota, large-scale production growth did not begin until after the discovery of the Parshall Field in 2007. Since then, advances in drilling methods and technology, a better understanding of the geology of the Bakken, higher crude oil prices, and the formation’s large size and number of wells all have contributed to higher production and to the potential for continued future growth.

As more wells are drilled in the Bakken, the base resource becomes better defined. Because the Bakken has a relatively low thickness (not exceeding 250 feet) and low permeability, better information on the location of available resources can quickly translate into an increase in crude oil production volumes.

Read more:

http://www.pennenergy.com/articles/pennenergy/2014/08/eia-bakken-fuels-north-dakota-s-oil-production-growth.html

 
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Water management company Comtech’s focus saves time, money for clients in oil, gas industry

Water-300x171By David Conti

In his part of the expanding supply chain serving the oil and gas industry, Dean Grose considers time his “most valuable commodity.”

“I protect it with a passion,” he said recently in the North Strabane offices of Comtech Industries Inc., the water management company he founded in 1995.

For him that means flying his own jet so he can travel to Colorado and back in one day. For the gas exploration and production companies with which Comtech works, it means finding ways to deliver, treat and remove the water essential to hydraulic fracturing in a fraction of the time it once took, and less expensively.

For the future of Comtech, it means Grose, 49, of Eighty Four and his team are developing what they consider the well pad of the future.

“The speed with which you operate can set you apart,” he said, noting that permits for some of the wastewater treatment facilities he’s building take up to 16 months to secure. “We have to try to stay at the forefront.”

Doing so in an industry that is growing exponentially since drillers first tapped the Marcellus shale just a decade ago required Comtech to find a niche, Grose said. Getting into that niche has allowed the privately held company to increase its payroll to 137 employees, up from 28 workers five years ago, he said. He predicted revenue this year of $83 million, but did not provide previous years’ figures.

Read more:
http://triblive.com/business/headlines/6384611-74/comtech-grose-company#ixzz39Wrpxnyp

 
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